FREE PUBLIC EVENTS

This is a free public event

This is a free public event

Open to all postgraduates

Open to all postgraduates

Posted in Uncategorized.

CONFERENCE HANDBOOK NOW AVAILABLE

As a green alternative to printing large and environmentally wasteful Conference Handbooks, the Perspectives on Progress committee has opted to provide a digital version which can be accessed on portable electronic devices or printed by delegates should they prefer a hardcopy.

The Conference Handbook can be downloaded here. The Conference Handbook is a comprehensive guide to conference events which complements the abridged Conference Programme posted earlier this week.

Delegates will be given a hardcopy of the most up-to-date version of the Conference Programme from the registration desk at the conference.

 

Posted in Uncategorized.

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME NOW AVAILABLE

The final programme for Perspectives on Progress 2013 is now available for download.

Posted in Uncategorized.

Registration

Registration is now open! Registrations can be secured at lower ‘early bird’ rates, which will apply until the end of August. Standard registration fees will apply from September 1st until the close of registration on November 15th. If you wish to attend the Conference Dinner, tickets can also be procured from this site until this date. For further information, please refer to the REGISTRATION and the CONFERENCE DINNER pages.

Posted in Uncategorized.

Public Plenary Session – Professor David Christian, ‘Is there Progress in the History of the Universe?’

 The PoP Committee is thrilled to confirm that in conjunction with The Centre for the History of European Discourses, Perspectives on Progress 2013 will host a Public Plenary Session by Professor David Christian of Macquarie University, director of the Big History Institute.

 Professor Christian’s plenary, slated for the evening of 27 November, will address the question, ‘Is there Progress in the History of the Universe?’

 Trained as an historian of nineteenth century Russia, Professor Christian in the late-1980s pioneered an interdisciplinary approach to the study of world history known as Big History. Big History expands the traditional conceptual and temporal limits of the discipline, situating the development of human history in the context of very large time scales, encompassing cosmology, astronomy and biology in order to explore the almost fourteen billion years of world history since the Big Bang.

 Professor Christian’s 2011 TED talk ‘The History our World in 18 Minutes,’ can be viewed here.

 

Posted in Information.

Science, Progress and History Essay Competition

Science, Progress and History

The organising committee wishes to draw delegates’ attention to the Essay Competition being held by the ‘Science, Progress and History’ project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation and the University of Queensland’s Centre for the History of European Discourses.

The Science, Progress and History Essay Competition invites essay submissions from students and recent graduates on any subject relevant to the main themes of the project. There will be three prizes of $5,000, three prizes of $2,000, and three prizes of $1,000 awarded in Australian dollars.

Delegates interested in being considered for the competition should visit:  http://www.ched.uq.edu.au/sph-essay-competition

Posted in Information.

Second Call for Papers – abstract deadline is 31 May

The organising committee is pleased announce that Dr. Alastair Blanshard, Dr. Sarah Pinto and Dr. Ian Hesketh have each agreed to deliver Key Note Addresses at Perspectives on Progress, 2013.

Dr. Blanshard is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Sydney. His most recent monograph is Sex, Vice, and Love from Antiquity to Modernity (Wiley Blackwell, 2010). In addition to his work on ancient sexuality, Dr. Blanshard is also concerned with examining the role that the classical past plays in the history of ideas.

Dr. Pinto is a Lecturer in Australian History at the University of Queensland’s School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics. She has published extensively on the history of emotions, history & gender, and historical fiction, including a chapter in the forthcoming Kate Grenville: Essays and Interviews.

Dr. Hesketh is a postdoctoral research fellow based at the University of Queensland’s Centre for the History of European Discourses currently working on the “Science, Progress and History” project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation. Most broadly, his research considers the relationship between history, science, and religion in nineteenth-century Britain. His publications include Of Apes and Ancestors: Evolution, Christianity, and the Oxford Debate (University of Toronto Press 2009), and The Science of History in Victorian Britain (Pickering & Chatto, 2011). Dr. Hesketh was also the Assistant Editor and Project Manager of The Oxford History of Historical Writing. (Oxford University Press, 2011–12).

Call for Papers

In 1968, historian Sidney Pollard defined the Victorian ideal of ‘progress’ as, “the assumption that a pattern of change exists in the history of mankind… that it consists of irreversible changes in one direction only, and that this direction is towards improvement.” Despite the increasingly problematic nature of this ideal, the ‘progress myth’ still remains pervasive in the Western cultural tradition.

This postgraduate and early career researcher conference seeks to promote innovative interdisciplinary dialogues interrogating the concept of progress by bringing together scholars from across the humanities and social sciences.

Contributions are invited from disciplines ranging from history, classics, religion and philosophy through literary, media and cultural studies to anthropology, psychology and political science. Conference delegates will be invited to consider how the idea of progress influences their own work, while being given the opportunity to explore how this intersects with scholarship in other disciplines.

The conference committee invites proposals for papers in the form of an abstract of between 250 and 300 words to perspectivesonprogress2013@gmail.com by 31 May 2013. Paper format is a 20 minute paper with a 10 minute period for questions and answers.

Please see the original call for papers for more information.

Posted in Call For Papers.

Welcome…

On behalf of the Organizing Committee for Perspectives on Progress, welcome to the conference website, the communication hub for this event. This conference is an opportunity for researchers from diverse backgrounds to pursue a specific area of inquiry, within a theme that genuinely influences the development of human culture. With this rationale in mind, we wish to encourage creative approaches to address the real-world issues depicted in the Call for Papers. Please feel welcome to share this information with potentially interested parties.

Wesley Theobald

Posted in Convenor.

Perspectives on Progress — Call For Papers

Perspectives on Progress

An interdisciplinary postgraduate and early career researcher conference. 

At The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. November 27-29, 2013.

Call for Papers

In 1968, historian Sidney Pollard defined the Victorian ideal of ‘progress’ as, “the assumption that a pattern of change exists in the history of mankind… that it consists of irreversible changes in one direction only, and that this direction is towards improvement.” Despite the increasingly problematic nature of this ideal, the ‘progress myth’ still remains pervasive in the Western cultural tradition.

This postgraduate and early career researcher conference seeks to promote innovative interdisciplinary dialogues interrogating the concept of progress by bringing together scholars from across the humanities and social sciences.

Contributions are invited from disciplines ranging from history, classics, religion and philosophy through literary, media and cultural studies to anthropology, psychology and political science. Conference delegates will be invited to consider how the idea of progress influences their own work, while being given the opportunity to explore how this intersects with scholarship in other disciplines.

The conference committee invites proposals for papers in the form of an abstract of between 250 and 300 words to perspectivesonprogress2013@gmail.com by 31 May 2013. Paper format is a 20 minute paper with a 10 minute period for questions and answers.

Possible areas of inquiry will include, but will not be limited to:

  • the relevance of progress as a methodological framework
  • philosophical and cultural understandings of scientific and technological change
  • conceptions of national and cultural progress throughout history; notions of degeneration and regeneration
  • relations between human progress and environmental transformation
  • perspectives on the past as a golden age; progress as teleology
  • progress and identity
  • political and geopolitical evolution and revolution
Posted in Call For Papers, Information.